Date Rape – It’s Not Your Fault

Posted by GPWHC on 17 April 2017

He was my ex-boyfriend. It was my best friend’s cousin. He seemed so nice. I had too much to drink, maybe I led him on. I know him from biology class, he’s harmless. Reasons that make it seem impossible that it happened. But it did happen. Date rape did happen.

Defined as forcible sexual intercourse by a person known to the victim, date rape, or acquaintance rape, is not about sex, but rather power and control. The attacker leaves the victim feeling broken, while they walk away feeling empowered. Date rape victims know their attackers, often a friend, and most victims tend to blame themselves for the rape. Date rape is never the victim’s fault. Most date rape victims suffer from depression, anxiety, and even PTSD.  

According to a recent college study, up to 90% of college campus rapes occur through date rape incidents. About 80% of those rapes occurred while the woman was intoxicated, and sadly, less than 10% of rape cases reported to police result in any kind of criminal charges. Acquaintance rape is the most common form of rape on college campuses. Acquaintance rape occurs most often after social events such as fraternity or sorority parties, or other places where students may congregate while using alcohol or drugs.

What can you do to protect yourself? To start, communicate your limits to your date/acquaintance. No means no, not maybe.  If you’re at a social gathering, be sure you have a way out. Drive yourself, call an Uber, or contact a friend to drive you home if you feel uncomfortable in your surroundings. Don’t stay in a situation you’re unsure of. Be sure you tell someone what your plans are and where you will be. Don’t drink. Alcohol will impair your judgement and effects memory. Be sure to attend events with people you know and trust. Have each other’s back. If you, or a friend finds themselves in a difficult situation, help them! Trust your instincts, and be assertive in what you say and do. Most importantly, don’t be afraid to say no. If you are out at a bar or a function with alcohol, do not leave your drink unattended. Drugs such as Rohypnol (ruffies) can be slipped into a drink in your absence.

April is sexual assault awareness month. The caring staff and expert physicians at Great Plains Women’s Health Center want to raise awareness of sexual violence against women and how to prevent it. If you have any questions on date rape, sexual assault or sexual crimes against women, please contact us. Remember, date rape/sexual assault is never the victim’s fault.





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Date Rape – It’s Not Your Fault
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Endometriosis – What Is It & What Are Your Options?
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Menstrual Cycles
Zika virus in the news
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Exercising While Pregnant
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Involving Your Partner in Your Pregnancy
5 things you need to know before you start trying to conceive


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